Seoul, Korea

Seoul, Korea

Seoul City Tour Bus

Launched in October 13, 2000, the Seoul City Tour Bus introduces tourists to Seoul’s major attractions. The bus departs every 30 minutes from Exit 6 of Gwanghwamun Station (Seoul Subway Line 5). One ticket will grant you access to all its routes throughout the day. Simply get off at your chosen attraction, tour the area, and catch the next bus according to the bus schedule to continue your trip. Each bus is equipped with personal voice guidance systems (headphones installed in every seat) which allow the passengers to listen to information about the attractions in Korean, English, Japanese, Chinese and French.
Telephone: +82-2-777-6090

Gwanghwamun Gate

Founded in 1395 by the first king of the Joseon Dynasty, Gwanghwamun is the main gate of Gyeongbukgung Palace. Roughly meaning “may the light of enlightenment blanket the world,” the name symbolizes the resounding dedication that the people of the Joseon Dynasty had in creating a new dynasty. Gwanghwamun holds a painful memory in Korean history. During the Japanese occupation of Korea, in order to dampen the spirits of the Korean citizens, the Japanese governing general destroyed the gate and built his own government building. The present appearance of the gate is that of 1968 when it was rebuilt using concrete, and it’s location is about 10m behind the original spot. Though Gwanghwamun is the most beautiful of the five palace gates, it was not designated by the Korean government as a national treasure because it is made purely of concrete. The government is now in the process of removing the Japanese building and restoring the palace.

Bukchon Hanok Village

Surrounded by Gyeongbokgung Palace, Changdeokgung Palace and Jongmyo Shrine, Bukchon Hanok Village is home to hundreds of traditional houses, called hanok, that date back to the Joseon Dynasty. The name Bukchon, which literally translates to “northern village,” came about as the neighborhood lies north of two significant Seoul landmarks, Cheonggyecheon Stream and Jongno. Today, many of these hanoks operate as cultural centers, guesthouses, restaurants and tea houses, providing visitors with an opportunity to experience, learn and immerse themselves in traditional Korean culture.

Check out more about Seoul in http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/